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Hamish by Andy Scott  
     
  10 foot tall stag, galvanised steel.  Location varies around Scotland, home is the galvanising firm Highland Colour Coaters in Cumbernauld, Scotland, a firm which does a lot of the glavanising of Andy Scott sculptues.  Red seen at Pyramids Business Park overlooking the east-bound carriage of the M8 at Bathgate.  Blue seen at Lossiemouth Golf Club.  Yellow seen at Highland Colour Coaters Cumbernauld factory (G67 2JH).  
   
     
   
     
   
    
   
   
   
    
   
     
  Heavy Horse by Andy Scott  
     
  Overlooking the west bound carriageway of the M8 in a field next to Glasgow Business Park in Easterhouse.  A 4.5m tall Clydesdale horse constructed from thin rounded galvanised steel rods giving an airy openness to the heavy horse.  Commissioned in 1997 by the then business park owners (G69 6GA).  
     
     
   
     
   
     
     
     
  The Kelpies by Andy Scott  
     
  Two 30 meter high horse-head sculptures, each 300 tonnes of structural steel with a stainless steel cladding, are the largest in the world.  Situated next to the new extension of the Forth and Clyde Canal near the River Carron, in The Helix Park at Falkirk (FK2 7ZT).  Kelpies are Scottish mythological shape-shifting equatic beasts usually taking the shape of a horse and possessing the strength and endurance of 10 horses.  The Kelpies sculptures represent the transformational change and endurance of Scotland's inland waterways and the historic lineage of the heavy horse of Scottish industry, agriculture, transport (including the tow horses of the canals) and economy.  
     
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
     
     
  The Kelpie Marquettes by Andy Scott  
     
  There are two sets of 1:10 scale marquettes.  These have been displayed in several places in Sotland and other countries.  I spotted them at Edinburgh Airport and The Falkirk Wheel.  They're sculpted from steel, small plates of steel welded by hand  then galvanized using a hot dip process.  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  Arria by Andy Scott  
     
  Arria, also known as The Angel of the Nauld, overlooks the the M80.  Drive into the village of Balloch then Eastfield, she's sited next to Eastfield Cemetery (G68 0EA).  A female figure, 10 meters tall, with two large swooping arcs from the upraised palms of her hands to the fishtail hem of her dress, the flow of water being represented in the arcs.  You can choose to see her with two sets of arms, or as I came to see, her arms are fluid, in motion.  The Gaelic name for Cumbernauld is “comar nan allt”, which translates as “the meeting of the waters”, referring to local streams which join Scotland's two greatest rivers, the Forth in the east, and the Clyde to the west.  "Watershed" a poem by Jim Carruth, is inscribed around near the bottom of the sculpture.  Erected on 24th August 2010.  
     
  Watershed  
  The first sounds spoken
from the spring’s core
are of a new beginning
of people and place
a poetry that bubbles
and gargles to the surface
to leave this watershed
flow east and west
in a rush of words
that tumble and fall
to join the conversations
of two great rivers
a voice calling out
I belong I belong
adding to the language
of sea and ocean.
 
     
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
     
     
  Lomondgate Stag by Andy Scott  
     
  What's with the putting of sculptures on roundabouts?  A beautiful sculpture, shame about the traffic and lamp posts.  6 meters tall and two tons of metal, the stag stands atop a raised plinth which gives the impression of standing in water with a reflection underneath, very effective.  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  River Spirit by Andy Scott  
     
  River Spirit by Andy Scott sits on the Collylands roundabout on the B9140.  Installed in 2011 it stands nearly 6 meters tall.  The female figure evolves from a tree like structure and she holds a profile of the nearby River Forth out towards the Ochil Hills which she faces.  (FK10 3EF)  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  This Journey's End by Andy Scott  
     
  Sited on the Mary Wood roundabout on the A907.  A male and female figure holding hands to represent the bridging of two shores.  The male figure holds a crown which represents Clackmannanshire’s heraldic coat of arms while the female holds a draped circle of twenty three stars representing solidarity and harmony with the people of the European Union. (FK10 4LD)  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  Lifeline by Andy Scott  
     
  Sited on the Shillinghill roundabout in Alloa.   The hand is derived from the gauntlets which appear on the heraldic coat of arms for Clackmannanshire. It is sculpted in a semi-abstract and deliberately angular style, symbolising the uniforms and machinery associated with the military and emergency services, and is lifting the figures in a benevolent gesture of support. These figures revisit the traditional mother and child motif often found in figurative sculpture. The mother reaches upwards in gesture while holding to the massive hand for support, and the child reaches outwards fearlessly yet holds on to the mother. Is the child offering help or asking for help?  The figures are festooned with stars, symbolising the celestial references of most religions, without implicitly adhering to any particular religion. Closer inspection reveals the child figure has winged feet, a reference to the classical figure of Hermes and his role as the protector of travellers, appropriate for a sculpture at a busy junction. This sculpture also incorporates the work of renowned Scottish poet Jim Carruth. His short poem 'Lifeline' is a series of phrases which have been laser-cut from steel and welded to the sculpture, and lend the artwork an additional layer of interpretation. (FK10 2AG)  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  I Can See For Miles by Andy Scott  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  Air Spirit by Andy Scott  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  Fox Boy by Andy Scott  
     
     
   
     
     
     
  Steelmen by Andy Scott  
     
  5 metres. Two tonnes of steel  
     
     
   
     
     
     
 Till We Meet Again by Malcolm Robertson  
    
  9.5m high, 4.5 tons of stainless steel sheet welded to form hollow box sections that were then curved into twisting components.  Location Retail Park at Homebase car park, Livingston, West Lothian, Scotland.  
   
   
     
   
    
    
  Birth of the Sky by Susumu Shingu  
     
  Spectacular water fountain sculpture features cascading rain and floating clouds.  Location Livingston Designer Centre, West Lothian, Scotland. 
    
    
   Birth of the Sky Birth of the Sky Birth of the Sky Birth of the Sky Birth of the Sky Birth of the Sky 
   
    
   
 NORgate by David Wilson  
    
  1996 stonework and copper. Located at Livingston East roundabout, West Lothian, Scotland.  
    
   
 NORgate by David Wilson NORgate  
   
    
   
 Angel of the North by Antony Gormley  
    
  Steel sculpture of an angel, standing 70ft (20m) tall, with wings measuring 90ft (54m) across. The wings themselves are angled 3.5º forward to create "a sense of embrace".  The Angel stands on a hill on the southern edge of Low Fell, Gateshead, near Newcastle, England.  
    
   
   
   
    
    
  Exposure by Antony Gormley  
     
  Lelystad in Holland, made in Scotland.  25.5 metres tall, weighs 60 tonnes, made of more than 5000 randomly orientated elements in a variety of angle-sections that connect in 547 nodes with the use of 14000 bolts.  If this crouching man stood up, he would be over 100 metres tall.  
   
   
   
   
    
   
  Havmann Mo i Rana by Anthony Gormley  
  Norway. 
   
   
  Havmann Mo i Rana  
   
    
    
  Broken Column by Antony Gormley Stavanger   
    
  Broken Column consists of 23 1.95m cast and sandblasted iron figures based on a casting of Gormley's own body placed in an imaginary column from Stavanger Art Museum to Stavanger harbour.  
 
The figures in sandblasted iron are based on a casting of the sculptor's own body, and their placement reflects a broad perspective of people's life in this city. From the teeming life of the harbour, the din of traffic and bustling activities in the commercial quarter, to the courts and legal offices, the quiet calm of the churchyard and private lives behind closed doors. The iron figure standing in the fish market forms the cardinal point for all the other sculptures. It gazes along Skagenkaien, 10 degrees towards the west, out to sea. The very first sculpture was placed in its own room in Stavanger Art Museum. It stands 41.41 metres above sea level. The next sculpture to be seen on the journey to the sea stands in Mosvannparken at 39.46 metres altitude (41.41 - 1.95). The column of figures continues in this fashion down towards the heart of the city, through the city and towards the sea. 

The final and 23rd sculpture stands with 149 of its 195 cm underwater, on a rock beyond Natvigs Minde in Stavanger's port basin.Stavanger has a special sculpture project, Antony Gormley's "Broken Column". It consists of 23 cast iron figures placed to give the appearance of an imaginary column from Stavanger Art Museum to the city's harbour. The figures in sandblasted iron are based on a casting of the sculptor's own body, and their placement reflects a broad perspective of people's life in this city. From the teeming life of the harbour, the din of traffic and bustling activities in the commercial quarter, to the courts and legal offices, the quiet calm of the churchyard and private lives behind closed doors. The iron figure standing in the fish market forms the cardinal point for all the other sculptures. It gazes along Skagenkaien, 10 degrees towards the west, out to sea. The height of each sculpture is the same height as the sculptor - 1.95 m. The very first sculpture was placed in its own room in Stavanger Art Museum. It stands 41.41 metres above sea level. The next sculpture to be seen on the journey to the sea stands in Mosvannparken at 39.46 metres altitude (41.41 - 1.95). The column of figures continues in this fashion down towards the heart of the city, through the city and towards the sea.  The final and 23rd sculpture stands with 149 of its 195 cm underwater, on a rock beyond Natvigs Minde in Stavanger's port basin.  
 
    
    
   
    
    
    
  Sverd i fjell (Swords in Rock) by Fritz Røed (1928 - 2002) 
    
  Sverd i fjell is a commemorative monument unveiled by King Olav in 1983, sited on the shore of Hafrsfjord in Madla, a borough of the city of Stavanger.  The three approximately 10 meter tall bonze swords represent, peace, unity and freedom and stand on the site of the battle of Hafrsfjord in the year 872 AD, when Harald Hårfagre (Fairheaded Harald) united the whole of Norway into one kingdom.  The hilts are modeled on Viking swords found in Norway, the largest is said to be modeled on King Harald's sword.  
    
    
   
    
    
    
  Les Braves by Anilore Banon  
     
 
Omaha Beach St. Laurent-sur-Mer Normandy, France 2004, to commemorate the D-Day 60th-Anniversary 30ft stainless stee.  "The memorial consists of three elements: The Wings of Hope, so that the spirit which carried these men on June 6, 1944 continues to inspire us, reminding us that together it is always possible to change the future.  Rise Freedom! so that the example of those who rose against barbarity helps us remain standing strong against all forms of inhumanity.  The Wings of Fraternity, so that this surge of brotherhood always reminds us of our responsibility towards others, as well as ourselves. On June 6, 1944 these men were more than soldiers, they were our brothers."
 
   
   
  Les Braves Les Braves  
   
    
     
Robert Burns on bench by Richard Austin
     
 Sited at The Birks of Aberfeldy by the Urlar Burn, Perthshire, this Burns statue was commissioned by the Perth and Kinross Countryside Trust as part of the improvements to the Birks under the Perthshire Big Tree Country Heritage and Access project.  
   
   
   
   
    
    
 Dam Worker Monument by Ineke van Dijk  
    
  To commemorate the hard labour of the basalt workers, who played such an important part in the building of the  Afsluitdijk Dam, Holland (1982).  
   
   
  Dam Worker Monument back view  
   
    
   
  Man Meets The Sea by Svend Wiig Hansen (1922 - 1997)  
     
  Located by Sædding Beach looking out towards Skallingen and the entrance to Esbjerg harbour in Denmark.  In 1994 Esbjerg celebrated it's 100th anniversary as an independent municipality and marked the occasion by commissioning this statue, which was officially unveiled on 28 October 1995.  Four 9 meter high giant chalky white male figures. 
   
   
  Man Meets The Sea 4 men meeting the sea or 4 men on very public toilets?  
   
   
   
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